Category Archives: Bird Hunting

50 Shades of Blues and Bobs

A few photos from the last few hunts of the year.  We were lucky enough to manage to find several coveys of both Bobs and Blues.  We kind of like those cottontops!

It wasn’t easy and we had to work for every bird, but it was sure worth it.

We turned the dogs loose, chased some birds and made some friends along the way.

The end of a great year!  Lets hope that 2017 is even better!

 

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It Has Commenced

As the opening weekend grew closer my mind wandered further and further.  I found myself daydreaming about the great hunts from the past and hopes for even better hunts still to come.  I spend almost every night reading at least one Havilah Babcock story.   Even though the days were still unseasonably warm, the evenings were getting cooler and the fall air was starting to creep in.  I wanted to get the dogs out more often. Although, work and other engagements kept getting in the way.  Despite this we did manage a few preseason outings to find our legs and reacquaint ourselves with the hedgerows, waterways and the fields that were littered with ragweed.

A week before season officially opened I started dragging out the gear I would eventually load into the pickup.  All the collars were charged.  The remnant feathers, sand, a few spent hulls and a couple of water bottles from last season were dumped out of the vest.  I started piling up my hunting pants, chaps and the 15-year-old orange hoodie in a pile in the corner of the dining room.  I have a need to know where all this stuff is.  I can’t put it away in the closet or dresser, for fear of it being moved by an unknown being.  The loose shells in the garage, the two vests, and the shell bag were all sorted and repackaged.  I don’t think I have ever shot a full box of shells before getting into another box.  How can I have this many loose shells randomly stashed everywhere?  I finally decide anything bigger than a 7 1/2 would be stuffed into one box and labeled “pheasant” to save space.  I reload the shell/gear bag after emptying everything it contained on the kitchen table, much to my wife’s disapproval.  The season of random feathers in the house is now upon us.

I was on the road most of the week, returning home on Thursday evening in time to see the 3rd grade Veterans Day program.  The kids and teachers did a great job and it was a vivid reminder that everything we are allowed to freely do in this country is a gift from those who have served.  And to all the veterans, I thank you.  That night we loaded up the pickup and drove for 5 hours.  I had a full day of business appointments on Friday and then it was another few hours to the stomping grounds.  We made it with just enough time to get the dog chores done and relax a little bit.  I knew I wouldn’t sleep.  I never do the night before.

The alarm finally sounded although it wasn’t needed.  The slamming motel and pickup doors already had me awake.  I slipped into my clothes and dawned a jacket, let the dogs out to stretch and relieve themselves.  Stopping only to get a cup of coffee, I headed out-of-town in the predawn.  It was a beautiful and crystal clear morning.  The bank sign read 32 degrees.  The faint breeze was barely enough to move the condensation in my breath.

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As I collared Hide, my 6 yr old pointer, and Belle, my 3 1/2 yr old setter, I noticed I had the place all to myself.  This made it all the better.  I like hunting with others and enjoy the camaraderie in the field but there is rarely a more special hunt than one with a man alone with his dogs.  I took a photo of the sun rising above the horizon and took my time enjoying the scenery while I started my walk.  Fifteen minutes had not passed when I heard wings beating my heart into the ground.  I jerked around to the front and see Hide standing with the wind drifting away from his nose.  He stumbled into a covey on the wrong side but he had excellent manners and stood rigid while they flushed in three waves.  I watched the birds filter down in the cover below the bench I was on, and then go straight to Hide to flush just in case.  All tenants had vacated and I stroked his side before releasing him.  I gathered up both dogs  and we headed after the singles.  I bumped one and missed as it flew straight away.  Seconds later Hide stuck one and as I moved in, two quail rocketed up putting a tree between us and giving me no shot.

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We moved through the area and bumped a few more birds, with no shots.  It became apparent that the lack of a nice breeze wasn’t necessarily helping us. One about hit me in the face when it vaulted from the ground.  I spun around and whiffed with both barrels.  Belle cut across right in front of me and froze.  I grabbed my camera and snapped a picture that would never make a magazine cover.  They can’t always point em’ high on both ends. I flushed that bird right in front of her face and she cussed me when I failed to hold up my end of the deal.  I chuckled at myself for the ridiculous display of shotgunning.  …It’s..Back….

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I had enough and made the decision to move on, look for another bevy and calm myself down.  We searched for a while before we hit paydirt again.  This time it was Belle that had a stop to flush.  As frustrating as it was, I didn’t get upset with this situation.  She did the same thing Hide did.  Popped over a little rise and into a feeding covey with the wind at her back.  She stood as 5 or 6 birds busted from the sage.  I walked in front to flush and couldn’t produce a bird so I went back and released her.  She dropped back down the hill and I stayed up top, walked another 30 yards and stumbled into the rest of the birds.  The status quo didn’t change.  I gathered both dogs and gave them a good drink.  This time they worked the singles with a little less charge and they put on a show.  I didn’t do my part with either the 20 gauge or the camera.  On top of missing more times than I want to admit, these birds outwitted us.  I had to pass on multiple shots as these little rockets skirted the ground low and put the dogs in between me and them along with using the brush as a shield.  I can’t shoot, the dogs probably hate me, it’s getting hot and we’re out of water.  They win.

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I decided to leave the camera in the truck during then next walk.  I seriously needed to make some changes in my shooting or this was going to be the worst opener ever.  It was getting warmer and I had moved several miles to a new area where I had found some scaled quail in the past.  I turned Nelly loose, (4 yr old pointer) and Luke (1 yr old pointer) the newbie.  We covered a lot of ground and Nell got birdy a few times and finally pointed.  By the time I got to her I couldn’t produce any birds for the gun.  We wasted a lot of time trying to find them again and never did get it done.  On the way back to the truck I bumped a covey of bobs and I watched them down.  Nelly found the birds in short order.  Luke came and backed her with a little encouragement on my part.  I walked in to flush where I just knew the birds were and I was wrong.  They flushed behind me and to the right.  I wheeled around and …yeah….

I was licking my wounds and thought I had better let the dogs rest.  By this time the laughing was replaced with something else. I decided to go scout out a place for tomorrow.  As luck would have it I flushed a single scalie as I was driving out.  I hurriedly geared up, put Hide and Nelly down, and marched in the direction the single went.  I worked the hillside hoping to find the others but that didn’t pay off, but we kept chugging along. About 200 yards over the hill, I found Hide standing stiff as a board.  I moved in and flushed a lone bird.  It fell.  Let me repeat that.  It fell.  As in dead.  The monkey is off my back.  Two more birds burst from near the tall cactus.  I air-balled on the back bird.  At the second shot about 40 more erupted.  It was by far the biggest covey rise I have ever witnessed.  We spent the next 45 minutes chasing the shooting blues away.  The dogs did an outstanding job working the singles, pairs and small groups.  It was plenty warm but the wind had picked up enough to help us out.  I finally connected on several shots and both dogs made retrieves.  The dogs were spent and I was tired but smiling again.  I headed back to the truck humbled and grateful.

The next day was more of the same.  My shooting did improve though and I had knocked down close to a limit before noon.  Nelly was the dog of the day with more finds than any mediocre shooter would need.  Luke proved that he might have a little bird dog in him with his very first solo find and retrieve.  I really wish I had the camera with me for his first pointed covey but I had all but given up on trying to shoot and take photos.  I had to wrap up early and head back to the real world.   In the end it was still a great way to spend time in God’s creation.  The lesson from this hunt: Be thankful for the opportunity and enjoy the pursuit.

When I dumped all the empty hulls out of my vest and put them next to the birds, I laughed at my horrible average and almost took a picture.  Almost… because it wasn’t that funny.

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Luke, waiting for marching orders.

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The tell-tale sign.

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A few for later this week.

Keep the passion Stay addicted

The Little Things

She’s standing motionless, Tail erect, Feathers waiving

Looks intense too, Her eyes speak in silence

Close the distance, Quietly, Poised and ready

Expect it, Prepare to be startled

Glance back, She’s still stone, Heartbeats rising

Continue forward, One step then another

You hear it first, The sound unmistakable, Suprisingly loud

Spin to the left, One bird

Frantic wing beats, Quartering across, Feeling rushed

Mount and swing, Slap the trigger

Way behind, The others explode, Chaos

Too many, Can’t choose

That one, Cock bird, See the white

Swing through, Feels right

Dead Bird! Dead Bird!, Start the chant, Keep your mark

She delivers and wags, That-a-girl!

Black bars across a white breast, Beautiful bird, Not a feather out of place

She’s moving again

 

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Scaled Quail

Scaled Quail.  My unicorn. The ghost that eludes me.

I’ve had some suspected run-ins with them in the past but I (or the dogs) had never been able to get any of them pinned down.   They always seemed to quietly excuse themselves from a good dog’s point.  Leaving nothing but broken dreams and tracks in the sand.  I never saw or heard them flush.  They just vanished.  They are known for making men and dogs crazy.

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This time, they pulled the same ol’ dirty trick.  Two dogs on point, quail tracks everywhere but no birds to flush.  They had vanished. Again.  Dogs relocated and then moved on, but we kept returning back to the scene and hunting in every direction from that point until we finally pushed them to a point where they were forced to fly.  Too many tracks going in every direction to know which way they went.  Several more points and relocations ensued.  I wasn’t actually expecting the flush because I didn’t know the birds were there.  Hide seemed confused as well.  However, I did make the mental note that if we did have birds in front of us, this would be their exit.  The cover went from sparse grass on a sand dune to a broad stretch of dense but fairway slick, native grasses, thanks to the cows that grazed this pasture during summer.

The unmistakable roaring of wings came from my right.  I spun around and began to mount even before I saw them.  I picked out one bird and grassed it.  The second wave rocketed up at the shot.  I picked one, swung, and let the second load of 6’s fly.  Too slow.

I still wasn’t sure if I had just shot my first cottontop.  Everything was rushed and I didn’t know if it was Bobs or Blues.  Hide decided that he was going to retrieve this time. That’s a change of pace!  And it usually results in a bird with far fewer feathers by the time I get my hands on it.  The one time I don’t want him to retrieve!  He scooped it up and brought me our bird.  A retrieve even a lab guy would be happy with.  Not a feather out of place.  I had my first blue!

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Scaled quail, aka: Blues, Scalies, Cottontops…runnin’ little devils!

 

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A mixed bag and two tired dogs.  Life is good.

A mixed bag and two tired dogs. Life is good.

I always wanted to get a few blues mounted, as they really are a gorgeous bird, but these are headed to the freezer.  I guess we will have to chase them next year.

Puting It All Together

The New Year dawn slowly lit up the world and my face burned.  The thermometer on the dash read 15 degrees.  I put collars on two dogs as quickly as I could and rushed to get my gloves back on.  The dogs charged the vast landscape with purpose and pose.  I heard a distant whistle of a cock bird from the south and started the march.  Both dogs were covering the ground thoroughly and investigating all the likely places that could possibly harbor a bevy as they started their morning routine.  It wasn’t long into the walk that I started to think that sleeping in would have been an acceptable choice.  The thought quickly left me as I saw what appeared to be fresh tracks in the sand.  With the dogs out front and to each side I walked ahead and haphazardly followed the tracks in the sand.

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Its always a good sign to see roosts like this all over the place.

The sun was just above the horizon and I welcomed its warmth.  The blinding rays lit up the frost covered landscape.  The air was still and crisp.  The covey burst from the sage with a deafening blur of wingbeats.  They got up directly in the sun but flew hell bent for election to my left, toward the river.  I hastily swung my 20 and fell a bird with the right barrel.  My second shot was all for show, with nothing to show for it.  I couldn’t believe that both dogs missed this covey.  I didn’t care though.  We gathered up the first bird of the day and headed after the singles.  Before we reached the river bed there were tails in the sky with a Hide standing like a statue and the little setter backing.  “Whoop, Whoop..”  I said to the pointer as I walked in behind him.  I was nearly even with him when he took slow and creeping step and paused, then another.  “Whoa Hide!”  A single bird flushed from the frosty grass and gave me an easy straight away.  I knocked it down and the covey exploded.  I failed to pick out a bird and they sailed away.  A straggler popped and gave me a clear, yet challenging, hard crossing left to right shot.  I swung and slapped the back trigger.  He folded dead in the air.  I picked up the dead bird and called the dogs into hunt dead.  Not their strong suit.  Bella did a good job finding and catching the cripple.  I didn’t see where the covey had flown to, so we kept our course for the river, where we hoped to find some singles from the first covey.

I spied Bella on point to the front left and made a bee line for her.  As I got just within gun range a bird flushed at my feet.  Startled I through up the gun and shot.  The bird fell but was obviously not dead.  Bella left her point when I shot and headed for the downed bird.  We spend a few minutes looking for the bird I just knocked down.  And in those few minutes we experienced what could only be described as a “Cluster *&%”.  Both dogs were hunting dead, and singles were popping up all around us.  I swung on a long crossing bird and wasted the first barrel.  Then swung on another bird that offered an almost identical shot.  Missed again.  I broke my gun and extracted the two empties, as the bird we were looking for flushed under my nose and fluttered over a small knoll, never to be seen again.  After many more minutes and a few choice words I called the dogs off the search and accepted a lost bird.  I asked Bella if she forgot that she had a bird pointed about 70 yards away and sent both dogs in that direction.  Bella must have remembered as she darted straight over to the same area and resumed her point.  I moved in and flushed.  The open choke from the right barrel grassed the bird and Bella made a decent retrieve.  It was improvement at least.

We followed the wide and dry river bed for a while and the dogs found nothing that peaked their interest.  I walked across a pile of spent 12 gauge hulls and started picking up a mess that was left by what I assumed was a dove hunter.  As I was picking up the empties that lay scattered around  like a dirty sore, the garmin beeped.  Bella was on point.  I started off for her, and Hide took my cue and changed his heading as well.  The garmin said she was only 135 yards away straight ahead but I could not see her.  I kept Hide pretty close as I wanted Bella to have a little alone time with this covey.  I took my time getting there and thought it would be good for her to stand them a while.  The garmin know said I was within 30 yards but I still could not see a setter standing anywhere.  Hide moved ahead and disappeared over a small hill and into the lower part of the river bed.  I heard birds flush and hustle up the same small hill.  I saw both dogs standing and more birds took wing.  I rushed a shot at the last bird in the group and whiffed.  “Hide,… you big asshole!”I declared.  He claimed that he never saw her standing there pointing that covey and from where he dropped in he couldn’t have smelled them.  I told Bella that she had a really nice piece of work and it would have been perfect if Mr. Jekyl hadn’t shown up and crashed the party.  The covey had flown in the opposite direction that we were headed so we just moved on.

The next covey took wing as I was stumbling over a fallen cottonwood branch that the birds were using for hawk protection.  I missed a high percentage shot and then swung on a bird 180 degrees in the opposite direction and blanked again.  I could do nothing more than pocket two empty yellow hulls and take in the beauty of the morning.  As both dogs game cruising up, I asked them how that covey managed to go undetected.  They just stared blankly back at me.  We searched for the singles and Bella slammed a picture perfect point only to come undone when the bird decided to run off.  I lowered the gun and let that bird do some teaching as it flushed and sailed away with out the fear of a load of lead on its tail.  I whoaed Bella and made her stand for a while as I half heartedly flushed around hoping there would be another bird around.  After finding no other birds we moved on.

I was thought I was getting fairly close to the rig and I was daydreaming as I walked along when the garmin sang and then sang again.  I pulled it from my vest and saw that it showed both dogs on point ahead.  I walked around some willow thickets and saw both dogs standing on a little rise adjacent to some prime looking cover.  The pointer up front and the little setter girl backing intently.  I stopped to take a picture with my phone and then moved in for the flush.  I was even with the dogs and surveyed the possible escape routes that would make shooting the toughest.  I had some small cottonwoods to my immediate right that would make shooting that direction nearly impossible.  Birds erupted in every direction. I singled one out that took the left and most obstacle free route and left a cloud of feathers floating in the gentle breeze.  I spun 90 degrees to my right and took a poke at a bird through the trees to no avail.  We took a long time searching for the dead bird I finally let Hide wander off because he had given up the search and I was tired of calling him back to me to hunt dead.  20160101_102011

I had lost track of Hide while the Bella and I continued our search for the dead bird that snuck off leaving us with only a pile of feathers.  My phone beeped and I already knew what the text said.  “HIDE IS ON POINT.”  Apparently we were close enough for my wife, who had decided to sit in the warm vehicle due to the 15 degree thing, to spot a liver and white pointer standing in the weeds.  I kept looking for the bird on the ground as I didn’t want to lose a second.  Finally we gave up and headed for Hide’s point.  He was sure enough standin’ stiff as a board when we showed up.  Bell was off hunting my right but she never looked in his direction.  I finally yelled, “Whoa!” and she skidded to a stop and looked at me and then turned her head towards Hide.  It was beautiful.  As soon as she spied him she styled up into a really nice back to honor his point.  I moved in a flushed four birds in front of Hide. Two of which gave me easy straight away shots.

This was possibly the best two hours of quail hunting that I had ever experienced.  I got some great GoPro footage and am trying to figure out how to edit and post it.  I only with I would have taken more photos.  The afternoon consisted of running the pup and Magic and we only moved a few move coveys and picked up one more bird.  We had dinner with some old bird hunting friends and met some new ones.  All of which were staying at the same motel.  The next day proved to be just as good, if not better.  I hunted the pointer/setter duo again and they continued to make big strides in their wild bird progress.  As the weekend came to a close and we made the tiring drive back home, I finally felt the satisfaction of a great quail hunt.  I won’t forget this one for a long time.

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Two tired dogs after a few days of chasing bobs

Rock Bottom?

Is this rock bottom?

I feel my season is turning into a full blown disaster.  I imagine it is like a drug addict stuck in a revolving cycle. Perpetually moving and still going nowhere. There are times when the euphoria sets in and times when I want to shoot the dog. Of course I didn’t and never will, but you get the point. And just like an addict stuck in that predictable cycle, I know I cause most of the problems, and I just can’t help myself. I can’t stop.

So, what is my problem exactly? I…. I …. I shoot at birds that aren’t handled correctly. There I said it. I can’t make myself stop. I do not have the discipline to choose good dog work over shooting at a bird. Even though I so desperately want great dog work. And then, I get extremely frustrated at the dogs (and myself) for continuing to mishandle birds. WTF? Even I don’t get it. Even I know it doesn’t make sense. If you want the dog to learn to handle birds correctly, don’t reward the dog and shoot, or often in my case shoot at, mishandled birds.

So on top of one of the poorest shooting exhibitions I have ever put on, I now am rewarding the dogs for bad habits and flat out knocking. The shooting, has its own set of obstacles. I used to be a good to better than good wingshooter. That is back in the day, when I lived in bird country and hunted every chance I had. That was before marriage, and children, and work obligations.  When I was in a target rich environment. Sure I hunted hard and had to work for the birds but I had a lot of real life practice. I have slowly gotten progressively worse in the shooting department. So what gives? My eyes. I am one of the minority it seems as I am no longer right eye dominant. So, I am currently shooting right handed and am left eye dominant. So either I close one eye or I need to learn to shoot lefty.  Or can this be fixed with more focus and practice.  We will see how this plays out…

Eye dominance test: Look at a object in the distance. Make a triangle with your hands and center the object in the triangle.  Then close your shooting eye (dominant) eye.  Do you still see the object?

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Now back to the dogs. I can’t say that all is lost. There have been some bright rays of sunshine that have shone through, even in the gloomiest of storms.  For the most part the dogs are doing there job well enough.  Certainly better than the average dog.  They hunt hard and handle well, and that is better than a lot of other dogs I have hunted behind.  Ironhide has had some outstanding pieces of birdwork, and is learning to play the game with ditch chickens quite well. He still stops to flush and has stayed broke several times. Bella, who is a wild bird rookie this year, is starting to find and point her own birds, and she is hunting dead very well, even though she points the dead birds rather than retrieve them to hand. And Luke, the pup that doesn’t know anything, has had the instinctual fire stoked by having a few coveys flush in his face, during some evening road training sessions. But Magic… The most experienced dog on the crew, the oldest dog, has decided that she needs to see every bird she smells. See em’ on the ground, see em’ in the air. She doesn’t care anymore. And what have I done to stop this. Nothing. Nope, I shot, which just rewarded her. But at least she is still does a great job retrieving.  Like I said, I have created most of my own problems.   I have to hunt her alone now, until we fix this issue.

Magic makes the retrieve.

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Why is it that I can’t hold off, when I know I shouldn’t shoot? Why can’t I force myself to be disciplined? Am I so amped about shooting birds this year because I didn’t get to hunt much at all last year?  Actually I haven’t hunted much for about 5 years as I had been almost exclusivley training and trialing. Are the dogs pressuring birds too much because I have over worked them on throw downs? Will more exposure on wild birds straighten this out? I can admit that I am puting pressure on myself to kill a lot of birds this year. Why, I don’t know.  Its not like I will starve if I return home with an empty game bag.  I think it impacts both my lack of discipline and my poor shooting. I just find it so damn frustrating that I used to kill so many birds with my old lab/mutt and now I am struggling to scratch a few birds down.

Cooper with Huns and Sharpies.  I miss this dog!

Cooper in Montana

Cooper Huns and Sharptail

A good friend and mentor of mine that has decades more experience than I do told me this, “What you are going through is what we all have to go through at some point. We have to make a decision. We have to decide whether good birdwork is more important, or is killing more important.” My response would be that of course good birdwork is more important, but I know deep down I am a killer. My first 15 years of bird hunting didn’t require all this discipline. If a legal bird got up within range you tried to kill it. End of story. I feel as though it is ingrained in me. Kill any bird that offers a safe shot. It is a real problem for me. I want to stop, but it’s so damned hard.

I have to make the decision now. What do I want more? I want the good work! I am going to have to force myself to walk with an unloaded gun and only shoot properly pointed and handled birds. That is the only way I can do it. But can I even do that? Can I pass up birds that I walk up? Birds that the dogs had nothing to do with. Will I be able to overcome the need to shoot a bird? Will I be happy if I don’t shoot another bird all season? I can’t answer that. It would be disappointing to say the least. But I have made the decision. The dogwork must take precedence.  We shall see if I can stay on the wagon.

There is still hope. There is still time and still some hunts to come. One of which I am looking forward to more than others. Texas. On a ranch where the birds haven’t been hunted for years.

Like I said, “It hasn’t all been bad.”  For the remainder of the season, I think its time to focus on quality work and not the quantity of dead birds.

Ironhide on Point

Turkey Day Hunt

To keep up with Thanksgiving tradition, I managed to squeeze in a half a day of chasing quail.  It was a far cry from the four day weekend spent following birds dogs in quail country that I was hoping for. If nothing else, this season is teaching me, that we don’t always get what we want.  I grew up in pheasant country and Thanksgiving meant several days of chasing tail. Times change. Family move. Decisions have to be made.  So, my options were limited.  I could hunt a half a day before going to visit the family or I could not hunt at all.  Take what you can and give nothing back.

It was a pretty good half day for local standards on public ground.  As luck would have it I flushed a covey while driving to the spot I planned on starting at.  I let the birds settle down for a bit and then turned the dogs loose not far away.  It wasn’t long before both dogs were standing motionless with the wind in their face.  I took a few quick pictures (which look like crap) and then moved in to flush.

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Quail exploded and I picked out a bird.  A simple left to right crossing shot.  I fired and the bird started to fall.  I instinctively glanced back left for late flushers, but there were no more birds coming up.  Just as quickly and instinctively, I looked back to the right only to see a poorly flying and clearly hit quail struggling to make it over the first stand of trees at the creek bed’s edge.   I stood there wondering what the hell just happened as I watched feathers drift to the ground.  I thought I had hammered that bird.  I looked and had the dogs search for the bird that should have been dead on the ground, but we finally gave up.  We looked all over the creek bottom but found nothing.  I hate losing birds.  Killing birds never makes me feel bad, except for the times when we know we killed it and can’t find it.  It really bothers me.

After a long search for singles on the other side of the creek that came up empty we moved to a different location.  I turned the dogs loose at the end of a fence line that is home to the Old Faithful covey.  They may need a new name, as we came up empty there as well.  We covered some ground and poked around some likely cover on the way back to the vehicle.  I saw a few hawks soaring over a particular area and decided to check it out.  I have often found birds by targeting areas that the hawks seem fixated on.  The hawks moved off as I started to approach.  The cover on both sides of a wide mowed grass strip looked great.  Hip to head high ragweed with a bunch of warm season grasses mixed in, dotted with a handful of plum thickets.  I wanted to check the thickets on the other side of the mowed strip and started heading to the downwind edge.  Dogs were out front, almost to the first thicket.  I was watching the hawks again, gliding on the wind in the distance.  I wondered if I was fooling myself, by thinking the hawks were hunting quail too.  My eyes fixed on the raptors in the distance, my gun on my shoulder with my hand on the end of the stock, the ground erupted in every direction.  Oh shit, birds, bang, dead bird.  The dogs clearly missed this covey, in ankle high grass no less.  Oh well, it happens.  I never claimed to only shoot pointed birds, and the dogs didn’t miss handle them.  They were just off hunting more likely cover.  We searched for the singles in the head high ragweed but that only produced one bird that offered no shot.  The ragweed was about as good of quail cover as there is.  Bare ground that allows birds to run and five to six foot tall dried stems so thick that its hard to see more than 20 yards.

After making it back to the vehicle I had time for one more walk.  I pulled into an area that I hadn’t hunted in several years.  The cover looked great everywhere so I stuck to the fence row of a ragweed choked,  year old corn stubble field, next to some crp grass.  We covered a multitude of excellent looking cover, bouncing from field edge to fence row, to thickets, to brush piles.  Nothing.  I was getting discouraged and tired.  It was time to give in and head for home.  I swung back around to the original fence row I had started walking and headed for the car.  The dogs out front and to my right and my mind wandering.  The covey blew up right in front of me.  Boiling out from under a small, waist high thicket split by the fence.  As snapped to the right, I saw him standing there in a low spot on the other side of the fence, tail straight in the air, staunch.  How long had he been there?  I don’t know.  I pulled up to shoot but I couldn’t get on a bird that offered a safe shot, as they flushed low and on the other side of the dog.  Finally a late riser busted out and quartered to my left.  About as easy as it gets.  I fire. I miss.  Frustrated, at my shooting, actually at the whole fiasco, we set out tsearched on for singles.   I didn’t see where the bulk of the birds went as I was too busy missing the one bird that went left.  I kept the dogs close and handled them to where I thought the birds would have went to.  I kept loosing sight of the dogs in the tall cover, but I trusted they would be working in the right direction.  I topped over a small terrace in the old corn field, which obviously hadn’t been farmed at all this year, and Bell crossed right in front of me.  She slammed on the breaks and froze.

Bella turkey day

I started digging the camera out of its case.  As I was doing this, I noticed that Hide was on point about 20 yards ahead.  They were obviously pointing different birds.  They were facing opposite directions and couldn’t see each other.  I took a few pictures and then moved in to flush.

Hide turkey day

I didn’t know what to expect as Bella was pointing in the wrong direction for the wind.  I thought she may have run past a bird and didn’t want to move, but she was starring straight ahead, as if she knew was right there.   I flushed for her and produced nothing.  I released her and hustled over to Hide, who hadn’t moved a muscle.  I was sure he had a bird pinned down.  I readied the gun and flushed in front of the motionless dog.  Nothing.  “Little bastards are running on us” I said out loud.  I figured I had just sacrificed a shooting opportunity to get some pictures.   I released Hide and Bella, who was now backing, with the whistle.  Hide took the lead and hit a deer trail with his nose on the ground.  I followed and watched him slam to a stop.  A stop to flush.  Too much pressure.  A single male bob was in the air and I swung and missed.  Five more birds flushed at the shot and I missed again.

Shooting slump continues….

Frustration has set in.